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i was honored to be among three civil rights leaders that i was invited with the head of the naacp and urban league, labor leaders from three organizations, showing that it is not a struggle that has yet won. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory
and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the quality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come
, i stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil rights era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to get used to obama and sort of trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that h
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
honoring their achievements as well. there's a strong civil rights theme running through this parade. >> as there should be. >> as there should be. it is worth taking one last look at that on this inauguration day. >> it's a lot of history right there. a ton of history as we're watching what's going on. we'll take another quick break, resume our special coverage right here in "the situation room." [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! cisco. it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louis
permitted to serve in combat roles and what's next for the u.s. military in term of equal rights and civil rights. the biggest issue is what role the military will have in defending the country at a time when our enemies are fragmented everywhere and it requires very well-educated people and i think the next big thing is in my view is universal service. we're not going to be able to defend the country of ten million people and we're an extremely small force and i don't care what the technology. i believe in universal service. >> a la israel or -- >> oh, yeah. it's going to require some logistical changes and it will require a great deal of leadership, but if you have a situation where you have more people in new york city than you had at pearl harbor and you have an all-volunteer force you're outsourcing our defense for a small number of brave young men and women. that's the next big equal opportunity. >> that's fascinating. kayla, very quickly. you're a published author now and an outspoken advocate. i've got to ask you, political future. are you thinking of running for something, maybe?
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
progressive vision for the country. civil rights. women's rights. voter rights. gay rights. but some have been trying to say beyonce's performance was the
in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce returning four years later, this time, to sing the national anthem. ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ >> reporter: and as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment. one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: and as the first couple made their way back to the white house,
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
of illinois, that will have a whole bunch of american flags on it, not to mention the civil rights float that's going to be here, the mlk float, a lot of people just very excited. we are pleased, very happy, relieved that it was not like four years ago where it was freezing cold, but still a lot of folks who are coming in. they're bundled up. they're ready to go. soledad? >> suzanne, it's very interesting. i remember four years ago when i was sitting next to david gergen, presidential adviser, and when the motorcade was going down the parade route, and then it stopped, and president obama and the first lady got out of their car. he was really stressed by that. he was almost, i think it's fair to say, in a panic. he was so nervous because, of course, he was just worried. worried about the security, worried about the nation's first black president who had been sworn in, and i remember that moment when they finally got back in the car, he breathed a sigh of relief, kind of slumped in his chair, and said, oh, i'm so glad that moment is over. for secret service, i would imagine too, the same feeli
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
an unexpected new roadblock. two major civil rights groups have gone to court to stop it. jeff glor is here with the story. >> not many were surprised to see the american beverage association oppose this limit on sugary drinks but some were surprised when the hispanic federation and the naacp joined. the obesity epidemic is most acute in african-american and hispanic neighborhoods. the naacp told us they're doing this not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan approved by the board of health in september would put a 16 ounce limit on sugary drinks sold at restaurants, sports games, street carts and movie theaters. it's just one of his responses to the city's 24% obesity rate which result in $4.7 billion in annual health care cost 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkans struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometimes
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
and efferent dirksen on civil rights. that would not have happened if the government hadn't been divided and it wouldn't have been as easily accepted by the american people if it had not been divided. if this democratic president and mixture of republicans and democrats in congress say to the american people, we got a real fiscal cliff for you. all the programs that you depend on to pay your medical bills aren't going to have enough money to pay them, and we're going to have to make some changes to deal with that, people won't accept that, especially if it comes from both of us. and as far as who's supposed to propose it, well, senator corker and i proposed it. but we're not president. and we're not president. and i don't know what the governor of virginia's 1350er7bs experience was, but if i waited, we'd still be driving on dirt roads. the legislate,all 535 of us will say, no, mr. president, we couldn't possibly do it that way. let's do it ail bit different and we'll come to a result. that's the way our system works. we got three months to do it. i hope that the republican leader will c
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
close to the public hospital. on the 50th anniversary of the 50th -- on 50 the anniversary of the civil rights act. -- on the anniversary of thcivil rights act. on a closing note, just a report came out that the state about alma -- of alabama has revised -- if you just paid an expert -- if you would just play an exit of the governor. guest: a couple of things he mentioned. one is the challenge that local governments have. when you look ahead, now the state to coming out of the recession, one of the things they are still dealing with our problems at the local level. states often have to step in when local governments have financial problems. in pennsylvania, michigan, rhode island, the problems of local governments are the problems of state officials. host: we have not heard yet from the governor of alabama for the state of state address that will be coming in a couple of weeks. caller: as we all know, big money from a deep pocket contributors really controls the congress in washington. whether it is the republican house or democratic senate. in my opinion it also controls the white hous
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
accomplish a lot. >> absolutely. look at what eisenhower did. he dealt with little rock and civil rights. ike created nasa created anwar de demilitarized antarctica. and bill clinton, what would he have been without a second term. he's able to go around and talk about surplus because he had a second term. ronald reagan. i'm tire of hearing about iran-contra. diplomacy with gorbachev was a big deal. >> so you're not worried about the second term. >> not only am i not, the president can't be. >> make sure his team is focused the agenda and getting things >>> good morning. sun and clouds around today. it's going on a chilly one, but not as cold as four years ago. 34 now in town. 28 across the bay. good looking day today. inauguration day. sunshine, some clouds, breezy, chilly, some late afternoon flurries and snow >>> there's a record number of women in the new congress however, they are still far outnumbered by the men. we'll ask three female senators just why they think that is ahead on "cbs this morning" from washington. we'll be right back. thn this morning's "
. it was the only time that they could have a 20-19 vote. >> john: exactly. they did it because of a civil rights veteran in the virginia legislature who went to d.c. anyone in the media address this? even when the republican governor of the state said it was wrong, how were they able to do this on martin luther king day? itit was a holiday. weren't they closed? >> there hasn't been any conversation about how procedurally they were able to get that done. >> john: many think it wasn't legal. it will be challenged in the courts. it might be because virginia doesn't take dr. king's birthday holiday seriously. i don't know if you know this but i spent a lot of time there. my mom's from virginia. i have a lot of family there. >> i'm from virginia. >> you know it's not martin luther king. it is jackson -- they honor two confederate generals and this other fella. >> wow. cognitive dissidence. >> some republicans are backing away from it. >> and legislation hasn't passed on holidays before. there is no law saying you can't pass legislation on holidays. >> john: it is shady. to me, it seems like -- >> it
right into this. decades after the civil war ended, katherine stone, who we see on the screen, published her memoirs of what she called the gay busy life. that she and her wealthy slave-owning family had led on their 1200-acre plantation in prewar louisiana. the members of her family, she recalled, -- her words -- there was always something going on. formal dining, spend the days, evening parties, riding frolics, fox hunts, and to assist with these and other diversions, katherine added her family had -- again, her words -- quite a corps of servants to keep us well waited on since, naturally, no one expected to wait on himself. katherine stone's younger brothers also -- again her words -- owned a little darky in the quarters who eventually become his body servant. and to generate the wealth that sustained the stone family's life of, again, her words -- luxurious ease, some 150 enslaved human beings toiled in the plantation's cotton and cane field, six days a week, week after week, month after month, year after year. the civil war's outbreak in april of 1861 signaled the beginning of the e
-- we're much more civil than those guys, right? >> hey, civility. the highlight of monday. >> and friday. >> thanks, guys. >> all he needs to do is say bull shih tzu it would been fine. it's a dog. >> u.s. -- a u.s. court of appeals ruling unanimously that president obama's recess appointments to the nlrb were unconstitutional. we're going to talk to a senator, a republican senator, mike johanns, who is calling for the appointees still in office to resign immediately. still ahead can the rally on the street continue? we will ask jim cramer. but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk box," everybody. you can see the futures have actually turned ar
civilizations which sprung up on these shores. we're in sardinia right now, an island off the coast of italy, and the fishermen here go after the bluefin much the same way their ancestors did during the days of the roman empire. fishermen from the village of carloforte fix nets to the ocean floor, trapping the migrating bluefin in giant chambers. we went out with divers to check on their trap. we had no idea what to expect. floating walls of nets stretching six stories high. there's no escape here for these juggernauts who can cross the atlantic at 70 miles an hour. the only sound: the bubbles from the oxygen tanks. then a truly exceptional sight. seeing tuna on a sushi plate is one thing. seeing the king of sushi down here is something else entirely. within a few hours, the tuna and the fishermen would be face-to-face, locked in an ancient ritual called the mattanza, which means, literally, "the slaughter." the mattanza begins with a small armada. old boats with rusty hulls are towed out and hauled into position surrounding the nets. [people yelling] over the course of the next two hours, t
think it's to the interest of civilized countries to have an apparatus to be able to take down and rend asunder terrorist groups wherever they appear. >> schieffer: all right dianne feinstein, thank you so much. >> thank you very much. >> schieffer: we're going to get a slightly different take on all this now. we're going to new york and police commissioner ray kelly. commissioner, you just heard senator feinstein. do you think-- is this the right way to approach this? is banning assault weapons where you start banning these magazines that hold more than, say, 10 rounds? or do you see it in a different way there in new york? >> well, i commend the senator. i i think it's certainly a move in the right direction. i agree with it. as the senator said, it's probably a heavy lift in congress, but for us in new york city. >> and believe in most urban centers of america the problem really is concealable handguns. only 2% of the people that we've arrested for guns in the last two years have had assault weapons. we don't want them on the streets. make no mistake about it, but the problem is the
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